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PLNA e-News: Protecting Values In the Nation

Deportation of Undocumented Immigrants Would Lead to Severe Labor Shortages in Green Industry

Friday, September 02, 2016   (0 Comments)
Posted by: Gregg Robertson
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WASHINGTON D.C. – A study by the Pew Research Center shows that if the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in this country are deported, the landscape contracting industry will face severe labor shortages.

The 2015 study of industry groups in he U.S. that employ undocumented immigrants showed that the landscape contracting industry is proportionally one of the highest employers of the undocumented, with 24% of all workers in the landscape contracting being undocumented.

If 24% of the landscape contracting labor force were no longer to be available, the industry would face severe labor shortages. Even now, owners of landscape contracting businesses identify finding and keeping good employees to be one their top challenges.

Even if company owners don’t believe they employ the undocumented, their companies would be affected by a 24% decline in the available landscape contracting workforce, as competition for the remaining 76% of industry workers intensified. As well, other industries that are heavy users of undocumented workers, such as agriculture, construction and hospitality, would be competing for the same labor force.

The result of a general deportation would be an industry-specific recession, if not a general economic recession. Deporting 11 million undocumented immigrants would shrink the economy by about 2 percent, according to the American Action Forum (AAF), a conservative and pro-business think tank.

See the table below for detailed data:


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